Nebraska bill requires tracking of water used in hydraulic fracturing

Simple, smart rules can make a big difference in ensuring sustainable water use.

In Nebraska, a state that is at the beginning of the hydraulic fracturing cycle, the legislature is considering a bill (LB 856) that  would require companies that draw groundwater to install meters to measure the amount of water used and the amount of fracturing fluid recovered. Measurements would be reported to the Department of Natural Resources.

The bill, which has received no organized opposition and is expected to pass, is sponsored by Senator Norm Wallman, who makes simple sense in describing the bill:

“I think we need to know where it’s going, nothing new, I think knowledge is the key. Don’t you want to know where your water is going? It’s already being monitored so I think it’s a good thing to put in the statute.”

Ken Winston of the Nebraska Sierra Club spoke of the importance of tracking water use in a state where drought is a significant consideration:

In an area where the water table is precious, it’s just commen sense to track water used and the amount of fracturing fluid that comes back. A bill like this imposes small costs on operators in exchange for a substantial community benefit that allows effective planning for sustainable water.

Why not do that in Montana?

About davidjkatz

The Moses family has lived on the Stillwater River since 1974, when George and Lucile Moses retired and moved to the Beehive from the Twin Cities. They’re gone now, but their four daughters (pictured at left, on the Beehive) and their families continue to spend time there, and have grown to love the area. This blog started as an email chain to keep the family informed about the threat of increased fracking activity in the area, but the desire to inform and get involved led to the creation of this blog.
Aside | This entry was posted in Community Organization, Politics and History, Fracking Information and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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